tapestry

The tapestry work of Barbara Heller

The tapestry work of Barbara Heller

Barbara’s work has long been some of my favorite work in tapestry. Take a look at some current and past work in the photos below and then check out her website linked at the end of the post. Her work often deals with issues of humanity’s relationship to the environment but her work is extensive and varied and well worth study.

While we were looking at the show, I asked Barbara some about her practice and if she had any advice for younger artists. She said that she had had a teacher early on who told her to weave every day. She replied that often she didn’t know what was next. She didn’t have an idea for a new piece yet, so she was waiting for that to happen. The teacher replied that it didn’t matter. She should weave every day. If she didn’t have a new idea, she should weave her sketches or anything else she could think of. Just weave.

As someone who often finds herself in that place of “I don’t have the next idea worked out,” I found this to be exceptional advice. I think that the practice brings you through the times where you don’t feel an idea bursting out. The weaving itself will result in new experiences and the next piece will come quicker this way.

Barbara took that advice. She weaves every day and her vast body of work is testament to that.

A tapestry show opportunity!

A tapestry show opportunity!

Webster Arts is a non-profit organization that supports art in the greater St. Louis area. They run a large art fair every year and they also have a gallery space with shows all year long.

In 2018, they are hosting a show of the tapestry work of my students in July and August. This is a fantastic opportunity to have your work shown and support the community of tapestry weavers we're creating together.

Ten years of blogging about tapestry weaving

Ten years of blogging about tapestry weaving

Ten years ago today I started this blog. It hardly feels like that long. It began as a way to encourage myself to focus on tapestry weaving as a vocation while I was still working in health care. Through the blog I've discovered a vibrant community of weavers and people interested in fiber art. This community has been instrumental in my development as an artist and a lover of yarn.

Today I'm a full time artist and educator and I get to spend all day every day working on something related to tapestry weaving.

"In tapestry you only ever have two choices." Susan Iverson and tapestry weaving.

"In tapestry you only ever have two choices." Susan Iverson and tapestry weaving.

Susan Iverson was in Fort Collins this week to do a couple lectures in conjunction with the show FABRICation which is traveling from Virginia Commonwealth University. VCU is the school where Susan was a professor in the School of Arts, Craft and Material Studies department until her recent retirement.

Susan's practice of tapestry weaving has many similarities to my own. We both weave on floor looms. We both value abstraction and weaving tapestry that relates to the gridded nature of the medium. And there is a deep sensibility from her around materials.